APPLY TODAY: Summer Performance Art Series in Northern California

This summer, we’re handing over the ZERO1 Garage (San Jose, CA) to innovative performance artists who are pushing the boundaries of digital culture. Six projects will be selected to be part of the BRING IT! Performance Art Series, taking place at the ZERO1 Garage between June 20 and September 5, 2014. Selected artists will receive $500 in project support*, have complete access to the ZERO1 Garage, plus help from ZERO1’s Programming and Outreach teams to help you plan and promote your event.

ZERO1 is where art meets technology to shape the future. We operate at the intersection of art and technology, and expect you to as well. We welcome proposals for event-based performance art, including, but not limited to, live performance, telematic performance, dance, live cinema, virtual/gaming work, immersive installation, multidisciplinary collaborations, audiovisual performance, and more. We support experimentation and risk-taking, so BRING IT!

BRING IT! has been generously supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Scroll down to apply. Admissions will be reviewed on a rolling basis, so we recommend applying early. 
Final deadline is May 18, 2014 at 11:59pm. Artists will be notified of selection by June 1, 2014.

*Additional travel support up to $500 is available to support 1-2 projects by artists who live outside of the San Francisco Bay Area. Please specify in your proposal and budget if you would like to apply.

The Fine Print
Our goal is to host six performance art projects at the ZERO1 Garage from June 20-September 5, 2014. 

Projects should:
1.  Be innovative and/or experimental.
2.  Benefit from being hosted at the ZERO1 Garage.
3.  Explore digital culture, contextualize performance within contemporary art, and/or actively engage with the ZERO1 audience.
4.  Ideally be a one-time event, preferably able to take place in the evening, that is free and open to the public. If your project has a different structure, tell us how you imagine it working and why it’s a good fit for this program.

ZERO1 offers participants:
1. $500 in project support
2. Access to the ZERO1 Garage facilities: ~7,000 square feet, centrally located gallery space, open floor plan. Additional images available here
3. Support from ZERO1’s Programming and Outreach teams to help you produce and promote your event.
4. The chance to plug into ZERO1’s rich network of artists, techies, and innovators.
5. Access to ZERO1’s existing inventory of tables, chairs, projectors, lights, and equipment.

Please note:
•   Inclusion in program is contingent on artist and ZERO1 scheduling an appropriate event date between June 20 and September 5, 2014.
•   Two confirmed event dates in the program are August 1 and September 5, 2014 to coincide with South First Fridays, the SoFA District’s monthly art walk. This event takes place from 7-10pm with ~600-800 visitors moving through the space. Please specify in your application if you feel your proposal is a good fit for this event.

APPLY HEREhttp://zero1.org/programs/bring-it/2014

"Each piece and each direction have an approach. They’re not really rules. They’re more sorts of parameters or a process—a way of filtering out other things that aren’t really concerned with the idea I’m working with—and, I guess, by a strict adherence to the process, it creates a certain distortion. But it’s also what art is—the distillation of the idea. What I’m shooting for is just to stick with whatever that idea is and play it out till it’s totally this pure form."

Tim Hawkinson, Art:21

Tim Hawkinson, Pearl Vision. 2005.
Strapping Tape on Cardboard on Panel
"By applying strapping tape in concentric rings, keeping the fibers of a given ring parallel to each other, and shifting each ring a few degrees in relation to the previous ring, the illusion of a surface ripple was created." -Ace Gallery’s website

Tim HawkinsonPearl Vision. 2005.

Strapping Tape on Cardboard on Panel

"By applying strapping tape in concentric rings, keeping the fibers of a given ring parallel to each other, and shifting each ring a few degrees in relation to the previous ring, the illusion of a surface ripple was created." -Ace Gallery’s website

Tim Hawkinson, Untitled (Chicken), 2005.
Chicken Skin & Wire

Tim HawkinsonUntitled (Chicken), 2005.

Chicken Skin & Wire

Tim Hawkinson, Bear. 2005.
"For the Stuart Collection, Tim imagined a bear constructed of boulders. Eight granite stones - torso, head, ears, arms, and legs - were found locally.  Together they make a bear 23’6" feet high with a total weight of 180 tons. Bear sits in the spacious Academic Courtyard formed by three signature engineering buildings: Atkinson Hall of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the Computer Science and Engineering Building, and the Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall.  First proposed in 2001, assembly of the sculpture took place onsite in May 2005 and the landscaping was completed in November 2005.  Bear looks simple but was a sophisticated transportation and engineering feat. The process of placing and securing the boulders together was complex and unusual - actually unknown - in the construction world.” - UCSD’s Stuart Collection
julienfoulatier:

Tim Hawkinson, Bear. 2005.

"For the Stuart Collection, Tim imagined a bear constructed of boulders. Eight granite stones - torso, head, ears, arms, and legs - were found locally.  Together they make a bear 23’6" feet high with a total weight of 180 tons. Bear sits in the spacious Academic Courtyard formed by three signature engineering buildings: Atkinson Hall of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, the Computer Science and Engineering Building, and the Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall.  First proposed in 2001, assembly of the sculpture took place onsite in May 2005 and the landscaping was completed in November 2005.  Bear looks simple but was a sophisticated transportation and engineering feat. The process of placing and securing the boulders together was complex and unusual - actually unknown - in the construction world.” - UCSD’s Stuart Collection

julienfoulatier:

Tim Hawkinson, Sweet Tweet. 2004.
Fiberglass & Polyester Resin

Tim Hawkinson, Sweet Tweet. 2004.

Fiberglass & Polyester Resin

Tim Hawkinson, Sonic, 2004 
Fiberglass & Polyester Resin

Tim HawkinsonSonic, 2004 

Fiberglass & Polyester Resin

Tim Hawkinson, Fruit. 2004.
Unique Photographs on Foamcore on Panel
The fourth generation of hands sprouting from hands spell out the words love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. - Ace Gallery Los Angeles

Tim Hawkinson, Fruit. 2004.

Unique Photographs on Foamcore on Panel

The fourth generation of hands sprouting from hands spell out the words love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. - Ace Gallery Los Angeles

Tim Hawkinson, Laocoon. 2004.
Monster-Tire Blowout Made of Paper, Wire, String, Foam Rubber
labelleabeille:

Tim Hawkinson, Laocoon. 2004.

Monster-Tire Blowout Made of Paper, Wire, String, Foam Rubber

labelleabeille:

Watch Time on PBS. See more from ART:21.

Art:21 interviews artist Tim Hawkinson about some of his pieces, including Uberorgan and Emoter.

inspirartory:

"

California-based artist Tim Hawkinson is known for taking everyday materials and altering them in imaginative ways, creating works that address broad issues about the intersection of human consciousness, nature and technology. Here, he employed a mix of found objects and common household materials—including twist ties, craft wood, staples, and packing material—which he transformed almost alchemically into a complex and awe-inspiring sculpture.

Echoing the working methods of ship-in-a-bottle hobbyists, Hawkinson created a painstakingly detailed model ship that twists in upon itself, presenting the viewer with a thought-provoking visual conundrum. The title is a witty play on Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick, which famously relates the tale of a ship captain’s all-consuming obsession with an elusive white whale. The ambitious and imaginative structure of Hawkinson’s sculpture offers an uncanny visual metaphor for Melville’s epic tale, which is often considered the ultimate American novel.

Möbius Ship also humorously refers to the mathematical concept of the Möbius Strip. Named after a nineteenth-century astronomer and mathematician, the Möbius Strip is a surface that has only one side, and exists as a continuous curve. Its simple yet complex spatial configuration presents a visual puzzle that parallels Hawkinson’s transformation of the mundane materials into something unexpected.

"

Indianapolis Museum of Art Gallery Label of Tim Hawkinson's Mobius Ship

Tim Hawkinson, Möbius Ship. 2006.
wood, plastic, Plexiglas, rope, staples, string, twist ties, glue
filthymoraldisease:

Tim Hawkinson

Tim Hawkinson, Möbius Ship. 2006.

wood, plastic, Plexiglas, rope, staples, string, twist ties, glue

filthymoraldisease:

Tim Hawkinson

"

Emotor falls into the category of body depiction—references to the body—like the bathtub-generated piece and balloon self-portraits that I’ve done. But it’s much more about mechanics and probably closer to a piece I did that synthesized voice using really primitive methods. Emotor uses the expressions of the face that are so cued into reading the face. I took a picture of myself and cut the features up into little pieces, like a puzzle, and rearranged the features. And each time I did it, I created a different emotion, and that’s just something I read into it. Anybody looking at it would read into this, would reinterpret it, as I think we all pretty much interpret the same basic emotions—frowning, smiling—but I was interested in seeing how much inflection and emotion I could get out of the face using a random input of signals.

I was interested in using random signals, in this case generated by a television screen. And the screen had lights instead of switches. So, if there was a dark area on the screen, it would turn the signal on, and a light signal would shut it off. Just on and off, nineteen different on and off signals. There are nineteen wires for the nineteen switches and the nineteen motors in the face, all connected with Velcro. The initial idea was just taking random input and converting it into something. Originally I was thinking of making a three-dimensional realization, this kind of instant bas-relief sculpture. That was sort of interesting but still too abstract. Then I started thinking about imagery and the face and how any kind of input into the face—no matter how irrational or un-patterned—would still create something we can decipher, look at, and read and get some sort of message from. I’m using my face, but I don’t really consider it a psychological self-portrait or anything like that. I can’t make most of these faces myself.

"

Tim Hawkinson, speaking about his piece Emoter to Art:21

Tim Hawkinson, Emoter. 2002.

altered ink-jet print, monitor, stepladder, and mechanical components. 

(via aclockworkcoconut)

"Sometimes we do get rain in L.A. A lot of us aren’t really prepared. The studio has areas in the ceiling that sometimes will leak. And it was really great, just walking into the studio one time, and there were buckets around, all catching the drips. It just had a great sound in the space. So, I was interested in using dripping water, some way. I didn’t want just random drips; I wanted something that really felt like something you could dance to, something choreographed-sounding. So, I ended up making this almost computerized abacus. It was a machine that was sort of a drumming machine. It generated different rhythmic patterns. It was hooked up to solenoid valves, and each time the valve was triggered, it would allow a drip to drop into a bucket, creating a resonant plop. Each bucket had its totally different resonance, so it was a kind of sound piece."

Tim Hawkinson, speaking about his piece Drip to Art:21